July 22, 2024

Dale Earnhardt Jr. wants upset NASCAR drivers to be able to door slam after a race

Chase Elliott, the two-time Daytona 500 champion, is opposed to Bubba Wallace receiving a hefty fine.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. begs that NASCAR not be too harsh in its punishment of Bubba Wallace and Chase Elliott for their post-race door slams that occurred on Sunday night in Downtown Chicago.

After the race, Eliott also slammed the door on Daniel Suarez.

With Cup Series managing director Elton Sawyer confirming on Tuesday that the subject was on their agenda, NASCAR said that it would look into the situation.

Indeed, they are. We’ll talk about it in our meeting this morning and come to a satisfactory conclusion, Sawyer stated. “At this time, nothing to announce, but we’ll gather our team and have a discussion.”

According to Earnhardt, bumping fenders after a race to express discontent is a characteristic of

Don’t deduct points. Don’t really discourage this because racing is all about this kind of thing.

 

Indeed, they are. We’ll talk about it in our meeting this morning and come to a satisfactory conclusion, Sawyer stated. “At this time, nothing to announce, but we’ll gather our team and have a discussion.”

According to Earnhardt, drivers scratching their fenders after a race is a part of the sport’s identity and shouldn’t be severely discouraged beyond a comparatively small fee.

NASCAR's Dale Earnhardt Jr. urges people to come to the Florida Keys

 

“I don’t mind if Bubba hits the 48 after the race,” Earnhardt Jr. stated on his Dale Jr. Download podcast on Tuesday. “And it doesn’t bother me if Chase or someone else pursues Chase. And it’s okay if they wish to fine them. It doesn’t concern me. The drivers don’t seem to care all that much. $5,

Don’t deduct points. Don’t really discourage this because racing is all about this kind of thing.

According to Earnhardt, the only boundary that drivers shouldn’t cross is purposefully spinning someone out, as was the case when Carson Hocevar and Harrison Burton collided in Nashville last week while driving under caution.

“There’s a line now,” Earnhardt remarked. As a driver, you have to be aware of when something is too extreme, too aggressive, or too dangerous and know when to stop. To me, though, these kinds of things are almost innate. It’s similar to when the hockey gloves come off and a few people get a chance to hit each other before the referees intervene and say, “All right, enough.” The supporters have had enough.
“That must be possible,” he said.

Earnhardt was ready for the counterargument on the incident in Michigan in 2006 when Carl Edwards struck him in the driver’s side door while pointing a finger out the window, incurring a $20,000 fine.

He stated, “That has to be possible.” “Drivers must be able to perform such tasks, whether they are correct or not. I’m not claiming those are the best decisions. Not that I think the driver should do it. However, the drivers must possess some suppleness and be able to take a jab or two.

Earnhardt remarked, “Carl gave me a really hard hit, a t-bone.” “This wasn’t anything like that; that fine for him was twenty thousand dollars.”

due to the hand being out of the window?

Dale remarked, “I don’t think that matters.” “It’s my responsibility that my hand was out the window; I know that’s awful, that it looks horrible, and it’s dangerous. What actions am I taking? I have no business holding my hand out. I won’t allow that to change my thoughts on this, then.

“I prefer the more traditional approach where, man, I want to be able to drive up to your car and door you a little bit if you irritate me enough.”

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